Why do you want to be rich

For centuries, people have assumed that wealth would be a wonderful cure for all their unhappiness or problems. Why else would we work so hard for it? But when people actually acquired more money and status they wanted, they discovered that it wasn’t quite what they hoped.

I don’t mean to say that acquiring wealth is wrong or money wouldn’t solve all the problem. The important thing is that while we are making plans for getting filthy rich, we should also ask WHY we want to be rich.

What kind of persona will we become while acquiring wealth or chasing our dreams.

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Money Quotes

“You must gain control over your money or the lack of it will forever control you.” – Lydia Sweatt

Since there are no trees growing free cash, no money raining from the sky into our purses and wallets, most of us live in a world of budgets. But, the good thing is, when you take control of your money, you take control of your life, too.

Here are 19 quotes to inspire you to really appreciate your hard-earned money.

  • “Never spend your money before you have earned it.” —Thomas Jefferson
  • “It’s good to have money and the things that money can buy, but it’s good, too, to check up once in a while and make sure that you haven’t lost the things that money can’t buy.” —George Lorimer
  • “There is a gigantic difference between earning a great deal of money and being rich.” —Marlene Dietrich
  • “Money is usually attracted, not pursued.” —Jim Rohn
  • “If we command our wealth, we shall be rich and free. If our wealth commands us, we are poor indeed.” —Edmund Burke
  • “A simple fact that is hard to learn is that the time to save money is when you have some.” —Joe Moore
  • “Don’t tell me where your priorities are. Show me where you spend your money and I’ll tell you what they are.” —James W. Frick
  • “Many folks think they aren’t good at earning money, when what they don’t know is how to use it.” —Frank A. Clark
  • “Many people take no care of their money till they come nearly to the end of it, and others do just the same with their time.” —Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • “Money is only a tool. It will take you wherever you wish, but it will not replace you as the driver.” —Ayn Rand
  • “Money is a terrible master but an excellent servant.” —P.T. Barnum
  • “You must gain control over your money or the lack of it will forever control you.” —Dave Ramsey
  • “It’s not how much money you make, but how much money you keep, how hard it works for you, and how many generations you keep it for.” —Robert Kiyosaki
  • “The habit of saving is itself an education; it fosters every virtue, teaches self-denial, cultivates the sense of order, trains to forethought, and so broadens the mind.” —T.T. Munger
  • “A wise person should have money in their head, but not in their heart.” —Jonathan Swift
  • “Money is multiplied in practical value depending on the number of W’s you control in your life: what you do, when you do it, where you do it, and with whom you do it.” —Timothy Ferriss
  • “The quickest way to double your money is to fold it in half and put it in your back pocket.” —Will Rogers
  • “Money is a guarantee that we may have what we want in the future. Though we need nothing at the moment it insures the possibility of satisfying a new desire when it arises.” —Aristotle

 

Money is not everything but definitely something

“Money is not everything but it ranks right up there with oxygen.” ― Zig Ziglar

Is money really all that important? To some people money is the ultimate measure of success, to others it’s little more than abstract numbers in a bank account.

How important is money in your life? Would you put your entire life on hold for three years to launch a start-up if it meant you had a good chance of ending up a millionaire? Would you live on a lower salary in order to have more time with your family? I know people who have done both.

Once a student asked Bill Gates for advice on how she could become rich like him? Gates replied with:

“I can understand wanting to have millions of dollars, there’s a certain freedom, meaningful freedom, that comes with that. But once you get much beyond that, I have to tell you, it’s the same hamburger. Dick’s has not raised their prices enough,” he said, referring to the Seattle-area fast-food chain. “But being ambitious is good. You just have to pick what you enjoy doing.”

Source: Gates to students: Don’t try to be a billionaire, it’s overrated

What would you do and how do you define success for yourself?

Developing an awareness of what you believe about money and its influence on your self-esteem and life experience.

When you set financial goals, they need to be consistent with your non-monetary life goals. If the two are not compatible, then you will be in a constant state of internal struggle and frustration. Remember, money is the enabler to help you to achieve your life goals, not vice versa.

 

 

Seneca on books and wealth

Roman Stoic philosopher Seneca wrote this in one of his letters to his friend Lucilius:

Be careful, however, lest this reading of many authors and books of every sort may tend to make you discursive and unsteady. You must linger among a limited number of master thinkers, and digest their works, if you would derive ideas which shall win firm hold in your mind. Everywhere means nowhere.

The idea is to not be in perpetual locomotion and jump from one book or author to another…but to sit back, contemplate, and relate the facts you read to each other. But start reading if you haven’t already, and start now, or you would miss out on the huge compounding benefits of the same as years pass.

At the end of this very letter, Seneca also shared his thoughts on the limits of one’s wealth.

He says: “Contented poverty is an honorable estate.” Indeed, if it be contented, it is not poverty at all.

It is not the man who has too little, but the man who craves more, that is poor.

What does it matter how much a man has laid up in his safe, or in his warehouse, how large are his flocks and how fat his dividends, if he covets his neighbors property, and reckons, not his past gains, but his hopes of gains to come?

Do you ask what is the proper limit to wealth?

It is, first, to have what is necessary, and, second, to have what is enough.

Source: Letter 2: On Discursiveness in Reading

Following is the link to complete collection of letters from archive.org:

Only The Poor or Super Rich Say “Money Can’t Buy Happiness”

Money can’t buy happiness? That’s just wishful thinking. ~ Ruth Whippman

Money Doesn’t Buy Happiness, But…

It’s a saying that comes up time and time again. So many people will continue to tell you that money doesn’t buy happiness. They’ll tell you stories of all the people who won the lottery, only to be miserable a few short years later. They’ll tell you tales of humble folks who couldn’t be more satisfied with their lives.

Neither Doesn’t Being Poor

So, money can’t buy happiness, right? Well, that’s only part of the picture. Another way to think about it is that poverty isn’t going to bring you happiness either. In fact, poverty is much more likely to make you pretty darn miserable.

A number of studies have indicated that there is a certain level of diminishing returns when it comes to wealth and income. After you make enough to take care of your family’s basic needs — housing, food, clothing, etc. — more money won’t necessarily make you any happier. You might be able to buy nice things, but that 3BHK house isn’t going to make you much happier than a 5BHK house.

That’s one way that most people incorrectly approached this “problem” of being wealthy. They think that they can just buy nice things, throw extravagant parties and be happy. It doesn’t work that way. Money is a means, not an end.

It Can Buy Freedom

And that’s really what it comes down to. Money, in and of itself, probably can’t buy you happiness. But if you use it correctly, it can be an invaluable tool that can provide greater flexibility, incredible freedom, and a much improved sense of self-worth.

Money isn’t evil. Money doesn’t equal happiness. Money is neutral and it’s what you make of it that counts.

Closing Remark

When people start telling you money can’t buy happiness, take a good hard look at their finances. They are likely telling you this because they don’t have much money themselves. They haven’t tasted the freedom money buys. If they are super rich, then you know they are just trying to blend in and not look selfish.

Money can buy happiness because money buys peace of mind and opportunities for great experiences. Don’t be fooled by ego-consoling research and those who espouse! They are just trying to keep you from achieving your financial goals so they can feel better about themselves.

 

Wise and Witty Quotes About Money and Happiness

Looking back at the quotes about money that have survived through the generations, it’s apparent that thoughts about money and happiness have not changed all that much over the ages.

Money Can’t Buy Happiness

Several historical characters extol on the virtues of living simply and of the importance of faith, friendship, creativity and achievement over the pursuit of greater wealth.

  • “Happiness resides not in possessions, and not in gold, happiness dwells in the soul.” And, “By desiring little, a poor man makes himself rich.” — Democritus, pre-Socratic philosopher (circa 460 B.C. to circa 370 B.C.)
  • “Money has never made man happy, nor will it, there is nothing in its nature to produce happiness. The more of it one has, the more one wants.” — Benjamin Franklin, author, polymath and printer (1706-1790)
  • “It is my opinion that a man’s soul may be buried and perish under a dung-heap, or in a furrow field, just as well as under a pile of money.” — Nathaniel Hawthorne, American novelist (1804-1864)
  • “He who loses money, loses much; he who loses a friend, loses much more; he who loses faith, loses all.” — Eleanor Roosevelt, author and first lady (1884-1962)
  • “Happiness is not in the mere possession of money; it lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort.” — President Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945)

A Philosophical Disagreement

  • “It’s a kind of spiritual snobbery that makes people think they can be happy without money.” — Albert Camus, philosopher (1913-1960)

It Might Not Buy Happiness, but It Sure Is Nice to Have

  • “I am opposed to millionaires, but it would be dangerous to offer me the position.” — Mark Twain, American author and humorist (1835-1910)
  • “I’d like to live as a poor man with lots of money.” — Pablo Picasso, artist (1881-1973)
  • “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons.” — Woody Allen, director, actor and comedian (1935- )

Money Equals Happiness

  • “When I was young I thought that money was the most important thing in life; now that I am old, I know that it is.” And: “Anyone who lives within their means suffers from imagination.” — Oscar Wilde, Irish poet and writer (1854-1900)

My Favorite Quotes

  • “Wealth is the ability to truly experience life.” — Henry David Thoreau, author, poet and philosopher (1817-1862)
  • “There are people who have money, and there are people who are rich.” — Coco Chanel, fashion designer and businesswoman (1883-1971)

I want to be one of the “rich” ones. What do you believe about money and happiness?

More money will not solve your problems

I wish I was rich, I wish I was I had more money, then all of my problems would have been solved and I will be living a dream life.

That is how most of us react when we face any financial problems. All we need to understand is that having money will not solve the problems alone. If you think lack of money is your problem and getting more money will solve all your problems; then you are completely mistaken. Most people, given more money, only get into more debt.

Jim Rohn was an American entrepreneur, author and motivational speaker. He was guided by Earl Shoaff, another entrepreneur. So one day Jim asked the same question to Shoaff. Jim said that if he had more money then he’d be happy. To this, Mr. Shoaff replied – “The key to happiness is not more money. Happiness is an art to be studied and practiced. More money will make you more of what you already are.”

What Mr. Shoaff meant was that merely having more money will not change you from what you really are. More money will only send you more quickly to your destination. So if you are inclined to be unhappy you’ll remain unhappy with more money, though you will be crying on a silver mattress rather than on cotton coir but you would still be crying. If you are inclined to waste money and take debt and loan, then with more money you will you will only waste more and get into bigger debt.

On the other hand if you are generous, more money will simply allow you to be more generous. If you are a person who likes to help people, then with more money you will be able to help larger number of people.

Remember, money is nothing but an amplifier, it amplifies your internal habits. So if you want to be rich and happy then you need to change your perspective and habits about money.

If money is your problem, then money can not be the solution.