It isn’t what the book costs; it’s what it will cost you if you don’t read it. (Jim Rohn)

Brian Tracy: “Your life is never the same after you discover continuous learning, leaders are readers. If you want to be more successful on the outside you have to become more on the inside. You must be all the time continue upgrading your knowledge and skills. You can change all things for the better when you change yourself for the better. You may just be one idea away from transforming your life and you have to reaffirm the profound idea of learning and learning…. Continuous learning is your key to unlocking unlimited success and growth. That alone is life transforming.”

“It isn’t what the book costs; it’s what it will cost you if you don’t read it.” (Jim Rohn)

John Maxwell: “Learning never stops. Yesterday’s learning will keep me where I am. Today learning is only to be enough for today. Today is for today only. It got me on a path of growth which created an appetite to grow that has never stopped.I just see the benefits of it in so many ways. I can’t imagine going one day without learning something, experiencing something new, and then passing it on to others.”

“You must take on responsibility for your own education.” (Jim Rohn)

Zig Ziglar said: “When you finish school you don’t finish your education; it is a lifetime matter.’ Education goes on and on….. Education gets you a job. Self education gets you rich; formal education makes you a living; self education makes you a fortune. Never seize your quest for knowledge and development; thirst for ideas that can be life changing; and then learn to pass it on, and pass it on to your children.”

Where would you start if you wanted to improve your life? For things to change for you, you have to change! It’s about a mindset and attitude that will lead to actions!

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Learning is earning

learning-is-earning

Learning Equals Earning. True or False?

The answer is True.

It might surprise you how many people think the answer is false. And they use the examples of well-known people who are extraordinarily wealthy but did not finish school. The most frequently used example is Bill Gates, who famously dropped out of Harvard and went on to become the wealthiest person on the planet.

But very few of us will be like Bill Gates. Rather, most of us earn income the old fashioned way – by getting jobs that pay well.

Learning is part of economic survival for most of us. If we don’t stay current, up to date, and continuously re-skilled in our professions (regardless of what they are), we fall behind. Thomas Picketty, the economist who wrote Capital in the 21st Century, stated it clearly in the quote below:

Over more than 300 years of history, the only predictable factor that drives individual earnings potential is “skills and knowledge.”

Learn and grow, or go obsolete.

Bonus: Read the Review of Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Bill Gates | gatesnotes

 

Lifelong Learning

We need to teach how doubt is not to be feared but welcomed. It’s OK to say, “I don’t know.” — Richard Feynman, Nobel-prize winning physicist

Abraham Lincoln said, “I do not think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.” This opens the premise that learning is a daily adventure and doesn’t stop just because school does. Highly effective people are always focused on continuous learning and competing against themselves to grow and learn day by day.

As professional careers or working lives become extended, workplaces become more age and culturally diverse. On top of this many hard skills will need updating.

Today, with the demands made on us from every angle and attention spans decreasing,  even those who understand well the need for lifelong learning, can find it challenging to stay the course.

Peter-Drunker-quote-continuous-learning

In this video Bill Clinton answers the question “What is the most important thing you have learned?” at the Global Education and Skills Forum 2014:

I think the most important thing that I have learned is that there’s more to learn. That we should — that we should all be hungry for a lifetime.

Click here to watch the full video.

Very often, especially those who have had lengthy and rigorous training, take their foot off the gas once they have qualified, or reached a certain level of seniority.

You don’t want to go there – especially mid-career.  Make learning a priority.

Read more at:

Warnings: If you get good at learning and find that you know more than most people around you, be careful that you don’t turn into a know-it-all.

Did You Stop Growing

“Once you believe that you are Ripe, You are Ready to Rot!”

“Well, I did do a good job and definitely deserve a break!”

Well, it’s fine to feel satisfied with your past efforts and achievements. BUT……….And its a BIG BUT……….The problem is that it’s now your PAST

 

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So, you can’t sit and think of your past achievements as your source of contention because the future is still open for you – and for a lot of others too. And they might, in all probability, challenge your past achievements and leave you sitting like an exposed duck!

Dont-be-like-a-sitting-duck

The answer to this scenario must be to stop thinking that you’re all ‘Ripe’ and ‘Great’ now and slowly crawl out of your comfort zone seeking the next challenge, the next project, the next achievement, and then the next, and then the next till you know how much you still need to do!

A sure-shot way of dealing with this is to always set very high goals, sometimes beyond any possible conception of achievability, and compare your performance in any skill-set to the best that has ever been.

The following James Cameron quote on this subject is my personal favorite –

“If you set your goals ridiculously high and it’s a failure, You will fail above everyone else’s success!”

success

I’ll end this post with a question to all of you, a quote from Ray Kroc:

“Are you Green and Growing, Or Ripe and Rotting?

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Best way to learn something

If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished? — Rumi

Töpferei, Sanskriti

I found the story below being shared on a couple of websites. It applies to not only to blogging – but to everything else in life.

In his book Art & Fear, David Bayles describes a simple experiment by a ceramics teacher:

The ceramics teacher announced he was dividing his class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right graded solely on its quality.

His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would weigh the work of the “quantity” group: 50 pounds of pots rated an A, 40 pounds a B, and so on. Those being graded on “quality”, however, needed to produce only one pot – albeit a perfect one – to get an A.

Well, come grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity!

It seems that while the “quantity” group was busily churning out piles of work – and learning from their mistakes – the “quality” group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay.

All the students learned an invaluable lesson that day. If you want to be skilled at something, practice it effortlessly.

When it comes to software, the same rule applies. If you aren’t building, you aren’t learning. Rather than agonizing over whether you’re building the right thing, just build it. And if that one doesn’t work, keep building until you get one that does. The crucial lesson here is to test, experiment, push the boundaries and most importantly, learn from mistakes.

The people who tried more did better, even though they failed more too. Of course you shouldn’t try to fail, but you shouldn’t let the fear of it stop you from trying.

I wouldn’t go as far as to say that quantity always trumps quality, but where the cost of failure is low lots of failures that you pay attention to is a pretty good way of learning. Learning how to do things requires doing them, over and over again, making some ugly pots along the way. Through trial and error, and repetitions, you will eventually figure out. It just takes persistence, a real desire to learn, and a willingness to be wrong sometimes.

Work hard on developing the skill – Deliberate Practice

“Deliberate Practice does not involve a mere execution or repetition of already attained skills, but repeated attempts to reach beyond one’s current level which is associated with frequent failures.’ K. Anders Ericsson

In a few words, deliberate practice is what leads you to continual improvement.

Is there something in your life that you’re trying to perfect? Have you tried a quantity approach instead? (Just make sure to learn from your mistakes.)