Quotes From Today Matter

From John Maxwell’s Today Matters: 12 Daily Practices to Guarantee Tomorrow’s Success (Maxwell, John C.).

  • We exaggerate yesterday, overestimate tomorrow and ultimately, underestimate today.
  • The way you live your life today is preparing you for your tomorrow.
  • “You don’t win an Olympic gold medal with a few weeks of intensive training,” says (Seth) Godin. “There’s no such thing as an overnight opera sensation. Great law firms or design companies don’t spring up overnight…every great company, every great brand, and every great career has been built in exactly the same way: bit by bit, step by step, little by little.” There is no magic solution to success. — P.4
  • As basketball legend John Wooden says, “When opportunity comes, it’s too late to prepare.” — P.6
  • Most people want to avoid pain, and discipline is often painful. But we need to recognize that there are really two kinds of pain when it comes to our daily conduct. There’s the pain of self-discipline and the pain of regret. Most people avoid the pain of self-discipline because it’s the easy thing to do. What they may not realize is that the pain of self-discipline is momentary but the pay-off is long lasting. — P.26
  • Someone once defined hard work as the accumulation of the easy things you didn’t do when you should have. — P.27
  • You may have a million reasons not to get started now. But deep down, none of them can be as compelling as your desire to change, grow, and succeed. In a month or a year or five years from now, you may have only one regret — that you didn’t start now. Today matters. The way you spend today really can change your life. — P.31
  • Success is peace of mind, which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you did your best to become the best that you are capable of becoming. — John Wooden, P.37
  • Chinese author and philosopher Lin Yutang said, “Besides the noble art of getting things done, there is the noble art of leavings things undone. The wisdom of life consists of the elimination of non essentials.” — P.67
  • Because I wanted to improve myself and pick up skills I didn’t learn in college, in 1971 I began working on a business degree. While reading for one of the courses, I came across a paragraph written about Italian economist Vilifredo Pareto. It contained information about prioritizing called the Pareto Principle. It said that by focusing your attention on the top 20 percent of all of your priorities, you would get an 80 percent return on your effort. That was my eureka moment! That’s when I made this decision: I will prioritize my life and give focus and energy to those things that give the highest return. — P.69
  • British prime minister William Gladstone said, “He is a wise man who wastes no energy on pursuits for which he is not fitted; and he is wider still who from among the things he can do well, chooses and resolutely follows the best.” — P.73
  • I’m continually reading books on leadership and communication. Every month I try to read one excellent book in its entirety and skim a second one that may not have as much content. — P.128
  • I think a lot of the time we take relationships for granted. Because of that, we don’t always give them the attention they deserve or require. But good relationships require a lot of effort. To keep me on track in my relationships requires a lot of effort. To keep me on track in my relationships so that I’m investing in them as I must to make them successful, I practice this discipline: Every day I make the conscious effort to deposit goodwill into my relationships with others. — P.229
  • Pulitzer prize-winning composer Gian Menotti said, “Hell begins on that day when God grants us a clear vision of all that we might have achieved, of all the gifts we wasted, of all that we might have done that we did not do.” — P.281

 

Pearls of Wisdom – Norman Vincent Peale

“Throw your heart over the fence and the rest will follow.”

Norman Vincent Peale is the author of the famous book The Power of Positive Thinking. That book and other works from Peale went on to sell tens of millions of copies. During the depression he, JC Penney and Thomas Watson – of IBM fame – spent time on philanthropy. Peale also had his own radio show for over half a decade.

Here are some of my favorite tips from Peale.

  1. Focus on today.
    • Don’t take tomorrow to bed with you.
  2. Don’t walk around with the world on your shoulders.
    • Drop the idea that you are Atlas carrying the world on your shoulders. The world would go on even without you. Don’t take yourself so seriously.
  3. You may be surprised if you just step up and face your obstacles.
    • Stand up to your obstacles and do something about them. You will find that they haven’t half the strength you think they have.
    • The “how” thinker gets problems solved effectively because he wastes no time with futile “ifs” but goes right to work on the creative “how.”
  4. Understand to overcome.
    • Understanding can overcome any situation, however mysterious or insurmountable it may appear to be.
  5. Expect to get what you expect.
    • Any fact facing us is not as important as our attitude toward it, for that determines our success or failure. The way you think about a fact may defeat you before you ever do anything about it. You are overcome by the fact because you think you are.
    • Formulate and stamp indelibly on your mind a mental picture of yourself as succeeding. Hold this picture tenaciously. Never permit it to fade. Your mind will seek to develop the picture… Do not build up obstacles in your imagination.
    • Believe it is possible to solve your problem. Tremendous things happen to the believer. So believe the answer will come. It will.
  6. Find the upsides of the problem.
    • Every problem has in it the seeds of its own solution. If you don’t have any problems, you don’t get any seeds.
    • Problems are to the mind what exercise is to the muscles, they toughen and make strong.
  7. Check your phraseology.
    • Watch your manner of speech if you wish to develop a peaceful state of mind. Start each day by affirming peaceful, contented and happy attitudes and your days will tend to be pleasant and successful.
    • Never talk defeat. Use words like hope, belief, faith, victory.
  8. Don’t go too fast.
    • To go fast, row slowly.
  9. Develop the most useful habits of thinking.
    • Our happiness depends on the habit of mind we cultivate. So practice happy thinking every day. Cultivate the merry heart, develop the happiness habit, and life will become a continual feast.
    • Repetition of the same thought or physical action develops into a habit which, repeated frequently enough, becomes an automatic reflex.
  10. Learn not only from your mistakes.
    • We’ve all heard that we have to learn from our mistakes, but I think it’s more important to learn from successes. If you learn only from your mistakes, you are inclined to learn only errors.
    • Check what you did right and don’t get lost in basking on your glory. It will make it easier to repeat whatever you did that created the success.