Your Attention Is For Sale

Attracting your attention and then keeping it has become a big business. From entertainment to the media, from Google to Facebook… screens persistently compete for our eyeballs.

But the market for our attention isn’t new, it’s been developing for well over a century. Before clickbait, there were tabloid newspapers laden with lurid headlines and risque images.

This flood of data can be so overwhelming that it can leave us wasting our time on things we don’t even care about.

Our attention is one of our most valuable commodities, because where we direct our focus determines the quality and content of our lives.

“A man is what he does with his attention and mine is not for sale.” -John Ciardi

Decide to take control of your life, by taking control of where you direct your attention.

Make conscious decisions about what you watch and read.

Disconnect from the constant flow of information for a period of time during the day, and learn to filter out that which is not useful to the life you desire.

Don’t sell your attention…decide instead, where you will spend it.

Read more:

  • [Article] https://markmanson.net/attention
  • [Book] The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads by Tim Wu
  • [Book] Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World by Cal Newport

Will Cloud be a new beginning for IT department

It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.

…IT job security is often dependent on making things hard, slow, and complex. If the Exchange Server didn’t require two people to babysit it at all times, that would mean two friends out of work. Of course using hosted Gmail is a bad idea! It’s the same forces and mechanics that slowly turned unions from a force of progress (proper working conditions for all!) to a force of stagnation (only Jack can move the conference chairs, Joe is the only guy who can fix the microphone).

But change is coming…

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A changing landscape
The cloud does not threaten IT jobs, nor does it reduce the importance of IT departments. If anything, the short-term trend is an increase in importance as users realize that they need the help of IT to manage the complex server and application environments that are being created ad-hoc in their rush to move to the cloud.

As with most new technologies, cloud computing won’t promote a destruction of IT jobs, but rather a change in their nature. Just as developers have to adopt new mindsets to develop cloud-based applications and services, DBAs will have to adapt to cloud-based and big data oriented systems, and system administrators will move from the low-level infrastructure issues (which will be more and more the exclusive province of large providers) to managing complex environments, spanning multiple applications, cloud providers, virtual and physical servers, and even merging the internal data center with the public cloud.