Destination Disease

The formula is clear: work harder, then you’ll be successful, then you’ll be happier.

A lot of us unknowingly suffer from a disease known as “destination disease”, the most common symptom is the belief that when we achieve a goal, meet the right person, pay off their loans, graduate from school, make a certain amount of money, etc., we will be happy.

“When our happiness is based on a destination or lack there of, we put ourselves in a position where we can never be happy until we “arrive”. – KC Cupp

This disease which disguises itself as the ever tantalizing “bigger, better, and faster” trap, is a tragic way to live. Why? Because bigger, better, and faster are constantly moving.

It actually undermines the development potential because it manipulates you into thinking that you’ll only grow and gain when you arrive at a certain place. Yet the things that add the greatest value to your life and develop the richness of both your personality and potential are found in the process of life.

Well known American novelist, Ursula K Le Guin makes this statement, “It is good to have an end to journey toward, but it is the journey that matters in the end.”

In the book The Happiness Advantage” author Shawn Achor explains how he spent over a decade researching at Harvard University, on one of the largest studies of happiness ever completed.

  • One of the key findings in Shawn Achor’s research was that happiness fuels success, not the other way around.
  • This study shows when we are positive, our brains become more engaged, creative, resilient, and productive at work and in life.
  • So our level of happiness and the key to living our best life today comes down to how we internalize our external circumstances.

It’s the old glass half full or half empty syndrome.

The things that add the greatest value to you are found in the process of life.

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Life acts, you react

Much of our lives is spent in reaction to others and to events around us. The problem is that these reactions might not always be the best course of action, and as a result, they can make others unhappy, make things worse for us, make the situation worse.

We often react without thinking. It’s a gut reaction, often based on fear and insecurities, and it’s not the most rational or appropriate way to act. Responding, on the other hand, is taking the situation in, and deciding the best course of action based on values such as reason, compassion, cooperation, etc.

Let’s see whether or not you agree with the following statement.

“You are responsible for all of your experiences of life.”

There is a trick in this statement, it does not say “in life” but “of life.” You are not responsible for everything that happens to you, but you are responsible for how you react to what does happen to you. The formula is that, “Life acts. You react.” Your reaction is under your control.

In any life situation you are always responsible for at least one thing. You are always responsible for the attitude towards the situation in which you find yourself. Your attitude is your reaction to what life hands you. You can have either a more positive or a more negative attitude. Your attitude is under your control and can be changed. With the right attitude you can be a resilient person.

‘Do you have the patience to wait, till your mud settles and the water is clear?
~Lao Tzu